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Monthly Archives: October 2018

Knife Cutting Techniques

  • Julienne

This is a technique similar to slicing but not quite. The style leans more towards the cutting of strips. To achieve this type of cut, you would first need to top and tail (cut off both ends) the vegetable. The seeds will then need to be removed to cut the vegetable into rectangular pieces. After it has been cut into rectangular pieces you will need to cut it into strips along the longer side.

  • Dice

Dicing is another common cutting technique used by anyone who works in the kitchen. Chefs often use this technique on onions when making anything from pasta sauce to curries. There are also different sizes that you can cut the onion into depending on what you are fond of. Professionals prefer to leave the root of the onion intact when using the dicing technique. They do this so that they can keep the onion together during this process.

  • Mince

Use this technique when dealing with garlic. Many people prefer not to have pieces of garlic floating around in their food but love the flavour. Mincing is a way to get the flavour into the dish without having large pieces in the food. Crush the garlic with the flat side of the chef’s knife then constantly chop and repeat until you have miniature pieces.

  • Chiffonade

This technique might sound complicated and difficult but it really is quite simple. Chefs often use this technique to create a presentable garnish for the plate. All you do is roll up the herbs or leaves such as basil or spinach and slice them to make coils of garnish.

Tips For Grilling During Winter

Keep extra fuel

If you’re grilling using charcoal, it’s ideal to have some extra as charcoal burns quicker because of the cold and the wind – you don’t want your barbecue to be cut short because you’ve run out of fuel. If you’re grilling using gas, make sure that your tank is full before each barbecue session to make sure that your grill is able to maintain the right temperatures to cook food evenly.

Don’t over check

Once the lid is down, set your timer and wait for your food to cook properly. When you check too much, the winter weather will cause your grill’s temperature to drop and your food won’t be cooked evenly. Keep the lid closed and check only when necessary.

Practice safety

During winter, the grease can accumulate at the bottom of your grill quickly which increases the risk of fire. Have a bottle of water ready (it’s not as easy to access the hose during winter as it is in summer time) or a fire extinguisher ready in case of fire or flare ups.

Pre-heat your grill earlier

When the weather is cold, your grill takes a lot longer to heat up before you can cook anything on it. You also have to allow some time to melt off the grease first. Also, it’s ideal to pre-heat your serving platter – when the food is cooked, you don’t want it to cool too quickly. Serve warm, delicious grilled food on a pre-heated serving plate.

Take Care of Polycarbonate Dinnerware

· Polycarbonate dinnerware is suitable for reheating in the microwave oven but it is not suitable for cooking food. As tough as you may think this catering equipment is, don’t be tempted to cook food in it either on the stove or in the oven.

· It is dishwasher safe and will last you a lifetime with normal levels of heat and detergent, but avoid bleach or abrasive detergents. This could damage the gloss finish of the polycarbonate dinnerware.

· Dishwasher temperatures should be between 60 and 65 degrees Celsius for the wash cycle and between 70 and 85 degrees Celsius for the rinse cycle. If temperatures are higher it may lead to the deterioration of the material. The high heat could cause it to melt and become distorted in its shape.

· Whichever detergent or rinse aid you choose, ensure that it is compatible with the polycarbonate dinnerware. Also make sure that you use the correct dosage. If you use too much or let it soak for too long it could shorten the life of the polycarbonate dinnerware.

· When washing this catering equipment by hand try not to use the abrasive side of the sponge or a nylon brush because this could scratch the surface and ruin the gloss finish or, possibly, the material itself.

· If you find small scratches on the surface buff it lightly with a lens cleaning cloth and this should remove them.

· Strong solvents may cause permanent damage to the polycarbonate dinnerware, so avoid using it. It’s not worth the risk if you want it last you a lifetime.

Cake Frosting For Kitchen

1. Sugar, Butter, Eggs

You must whip sugar, butter and eggs together to get the base for your frosting. The frosting might need to have an additional ingredient such as sunflower oil if you want some extra flavour. If you intend to heat up the frosting later, it would be a good time to add the cooking oil at this stage. The cooking oil protects the structure of the frosting and it helps to bind the frosting where the butter is too cold or not included.

2. Whip to Consistency

After combining the initial ingredients, the whipping or beating process is in order. An electric beater will help you get to the correct consistency sooner. Once the mixture looks fluffy and stiff, you can now add your choice of flavours, extracts or colours into the mixing bowl. There are many flavours you can experiment with; from almonds and bananas to chocolate and strawberry. Cake frosting tastes delicious with a fruit flavour too. The more ingredients you add, the heavier and thicker the frosting will become. This will require extra whipping.

3. Heating

If you are planning to heat the frosting in order to add fruits or fruit flavours in it then you need to have some sunflower oil ready to pour. When the mixture is warm but not hot, you can add the desired flavours and ingredients. Heating frosting is only to be done on rare occasion and only if the mixture is too stiff to work with.